Snow on the Alps

For many of us, winter is a time of shivering through our time spent outside, finding refuge in a cosy blanket and a hot drink whenever we have a minute to relax.

Pets from our Past

Scattered throughout the Ashburton Museum photograph collection are a surprising number of pictures of people with their animal companions, which I often come across by accident while chasing up research requests.

Feats of endurance – Early Ashburton District history

Once again I have found myself enthralled by tales of Ashburton’s past, as told by Alex Hewson in his Once again I have found myself enthralled by tales of Ashburton’s past, as told by Alex Hewson in his 1918 reminisces, as well as Mary Anne Barker’s brief description of crossing the Ashburton River.

Proper Papers, Pretty Pictures

The Ashburton Museum is home to countless documents, diaries, pamphlets and books – we seem to have examples of just about every kind of archival material relating to Ashburton District and its history.

Many scientific practices or areas of study that were once considered progressive or novel are now considered pseudoscience and quackery - phrenology included. You may see phrenology head models and head charts occasionally in odd shops, making the notion of the practice seem a bit “hipster”, but phrenology was as dubious as it was intriguing.... Continue Reading →

Among the extensive archive collections at Ashburton Museum is the original Ashburton Hospital Admission Register. Covering the period 1882 to 1908, it contains over 3500 entries that shed light on patients, treatments, lives (and deaths) of many people from Ashburton. A major project has been to transcribe these records, now that enough time has passed... Continue Reading →

Remembering after the war

This is the final in our series of Heavens XV and reserves. Although World War One officially ended on Armistice Day, on November 11, 1918, sadly deaths were still occurring or being reported after that date. By December, Ashburton High School’s magazine began the dreadful tally of casualties. Of the 285 High School Old Boys... Continue Reading →

The King’s Cup connection

Last year, visitors to our Balls, Bullets and Boots exhibition had a rare chance to see a very important part of international rugby history. The museum was honoured to have been able to borrow The Kings Cup, recognised as the first international rugby trophy, and precursor to the famous Rugby World Cup. The large silver... Continue Reading →

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