The Namesake of Our Valetta

While the team at Ashburton Museum were working on Ashburton: Feels Like Home, our 2019 Spring exhibition, we became even more interested than usual in all the things that make this district feel special and familiar. Home is a big theme, and it was especially interesting trying to tease out the myriad sights, ideas, experiences... Continue Reading →

Charles Hopetoun Tindall was a well-known photographer working from a studio in East Street, Ashburton. His work has been featured many times in these blog posts, including many many portraits of Ashburton locals. This week, brought to you by the letter B, the images on this page show that it was not only people that... Continue Reading →

  The early history Gardening has a long and important history in New Zealand. Starting with the first Māori settlers in around 1400 and then European settlers in around 1800, gardening was an essential part of everyday life because of crops like kumara, potatoes and yams being a main part of people's diets. While Māori... Continue Reading →

  Our last summer exhibition, Dig In Mahi Mara, managed to spark much interest early on. It seems everyone has, or has had, a garden or an opportunity to experience the pleasure at growing plants, see them bloom and produce something enjoyable either to eat or view. The practice of cultivation is something embedded in our... Continue Reading →

One of the more difficult radios to install in our exhibition, Sounds Like Us, was the atom radio.  I guess that is appropriate, dealing as it does with the achievement of New Zealander, Ernest Rutherford, who as everyone knows, split the atom. While people who know something about science may have recognised the radio was... Continue Reading →

Sounds Like Us, our last year's summer exhibition at Ashburton Museum, seemed to leave visitors with a sense of nostalgia and wonderment, thanks to incredibly detailed model ‘radios’ by Weta Workshop. One such radio icon, designed by New Zealanders, Emma Clarkson and Wuqiong Shi, was the ultra-detailed beehive radio. Since the introduction of New Zealand’s... Continue Reading →

Just a little over 200 years ago, on Christmas Day, 1814, Reverend Samuel Marsden conducted what is widely regarded the first formal Christmas sermon in New Zealand’s history. His was not the first Christian service to take place in New Zealand on Christmas Day. Both the voyages of Abel Tasman in 1642 and James Cook... Continue Reading →

The highly respected Robert Galbraith was Ashburton mayor from 1915-1931. It was his misfortune to be the sitting mayor during and after The Great War. His story is linked to how the War Memorial in Baring Square came about. It is a classic story of debate, intrigue, politics, delay and money. Letters to the Editor,... Continue Reading →

Among the extensive archive collections at Ashburton Museum is the original Ashburton Hospital Admission Register. Covering the period 1882 to 1908, it contains over 3500 entries that shed light on patients, treatments, lives (and deaths) of many people from Ashburton. A major project has been to transcribe these records, now that enough time has passed... Continue Reading →

I was working on a series of clipping files pertaining to local businesses. Amidst the modern articles about openings and closures, I came across an envelope with photocopied photographs of the Bank of Australasia – a building which still stands on the corner of East and Tancred Streets. I was especially interested a series of... Continue Reading →

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